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The gambrel roof has two slopes on either side of a center ridge. The lower slope is steeper than the upper slope. It is used mainly on two-story barns up to 40 feet wide. The most common type of framing is light, clear-span braced rafters supported on the barn wall and anchored to the floor joists to resist horizontal forces and uplift.

 

 

 

Carey A. Williams, Ph.D. joined Rutgers University in July 2003 as its Equine Extension Specialist, and Associate Director of Outreach for the Equine Science Center taking an active role in teaching, conducting research and working with the equine and academic communities to ensure the viability of the horse industry in New Jersey.

A Wisconsin native, Dr. Williams earned her doctorate degree in animal and poultry sciences (with an emphasis on equine nutrition and exercise physiology) in June 2003 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She holds a master’s degree in equine nutrition, also from Virginia Tech, and a bachelor’s degree from Colorado State University.

She has worked extensively at Virginia Tech as a Pratt Fellow in Equine Nutrition, has designed and conducted various research projects dealing with equine nutrition and exercise physiology and assisted in the breeding, care and feeding of approximately 100 horses. At Rutgers, Dr. Williams maintains a herd of Standardbred horses for exercise physiology research; more specifically how we can decrease the stress of intense exercise. She also works with agricultural agents within Rutgers Cooperative Extension and the Natural Resource Conservation Service to carryout equine pasture management initiatives.  She has started several research projects on Best Management Practices with horse farms and finding ways for farmers to keep their horse farms environmentally friendly while maintaining optimal horse health and economic viability. 

She is a member of many associations, including the American Association of Veterinary Nutritionists, the Equine Science Society, to name a few. Dr. Williams has also recently been awarded the Northeast Section of the American Society of Animals Science and the American Dairy Science Association’s Outstanding Young Educator award in 2007, along with Rutgers NJAES Cooperative Extension’s Merle V. Adams Award to an outstanding junior faculty member in 2007. In 2009 she was also awarded the Equine Science Society's Outstanding Young Professional. As a hobby she trains and competes with her Thoroughbred mare at various local and regional dressage shows and horse trials.

 

Contact Information

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
84 Lipman Dr., Bartlett Hall                                                                                                                           
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
848-932-5529
Fax: 732-932-6996
Email:cwilliams@aesop.rutgers.edu
web page: www.esc.rutgers.edu

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